What Movies are you Watching?

TV, Movies, Sports...you can find it all in here.

Re: What Movies are you Watching?

Postby AngelicTotoro » Sat Aug 17, 2013 3:27 pm

...I'm just going to ignore that slight about one of my favorite movies ever. And move on. After all, it is a matter of personal taste and what really reached you. Everyone has their own opinion.
(I guess I'm in the minority that prefers the 2005 version to the 95' mini series. Don't care if the bbc one is more accurate, the movie brings me such joy and bliss, that I can watch it countless times. Oh wait, I've already done that too. :b)

I finally saw Hot Fuzz, it was awesome. Simon Pegg is officially one of my favorite comedians ever. (and Nick Frost is hilarious, they play off each other crazy well.)
obviously I'm going to see The Worlds End soon, because now I must.
(and yes, I've already seen Shaun of The Head, I like that too.)

Also saw Sense and Sensibility, the movie version with Emma Thompson, loved loved it. Col. Brandon is also brilliant, Alan Rickman was just crazy good in this role.
And I actually really like Hugh Grant as Edward. :)

I, for some stupid reason, let my eldest brother, get me to watch Ted with him. Hated it. Seth MacFarlane should be banned from making anything besides sandwiches for himself. :shady:
(I needed a serious amount of brain-bleach afterward, not the type of movie a christian young lady should watch. And besides, if I won't even watch an anime with half as much bad content as that movie did, then WHY did I let him convince me? I hate sibling peer-pressure.)
User avatar
AngelicTotoro
 
Posts: 338
Joined: Mon Aug 10, 2009 4:21 pm
Location: My home, The Camphor Tree.

Re: What Movies are you Watching?

Postby LastLfan » Thu Aug 22, 2013 6:59 pm

Finally saw source code, my brain hasn't hurt this bad since i watched inception
User avatar
LastLfan
 
Posts: 527
Joined: Sun Jul 15, 2012 12:37 pm
Location: Pallet town

Re: What Movies are you Watching?

Postby goldenspines » Thu Aug 22, 2013 7:18 pm

AngelicTotoro wrote:...I'm just going to ignore that slight about one of my favorite movies ever. And move on. After all, it is a matter of personal taste and what really reached you. Everyone has their own opinion.
(I guess I'm in the minority that prefers the 2005 version to the 95' mini series. Don't care if the bbc one is more accurate, the movie brings me such joy and bliss, that I can watch it countless times. Oh wait, I've already done that too. :b)
In your defense, I think the 2005 version is a lot more accessible to audiences than the 6 hour monster that is the '95 version is. For the sake of the story spreading to the masses, I'm glad they made a shorter version of Pride and Prejudice. Though, because I'm a super fan/purist over the book, I prefer the longer version (I'm dumb like that with Shakespeare adapted into movies too. They can't cut anything out. D: ). But both versions have their own charms, I think. Yet, like the_wolfs_howl, I sadly couldn't enjoy the newer version as much, even though I wanted to (because I was thinking too much on what great things they left out from the book instead of being able to enjoy the story. ;_; ), but I'm glad you and many others still enjoy it! : D



Since I'm here, switching gears a bit, I recently revisited an old classic from my childhood in The Rescuers Down Under. I hadn't seen it since I was 6 or something and it was still pretty fun and I got a lot more of the jokes this time around. XD
Image
User avatar
goldenspines
 
Posts: 4869
Joined: Thu Jan 18, 2007 8:42 am
Location: Up north somewhere.

Re: What Movies are you Watching?

Postby ClaecElric4God » Fri Aug 23, 2013 7:11 pm

Watched Oz the Great and Powerful. Hmm...It was good, but I was actually surprised at James Franco. It seemed like he didn't really do his best. Though his facial expressions basically make the movie. Overall, it was fun. Better than the nightmare of '39.

And Jack the Giant Slayer. One thing went through my head the whole time I was watching this movie: Shingeki no Kyojin.
SPOILER: Highlight text to read: I love how Jack is the hero, but Elmont basically saves the world 4 or 5 times. All Jack did was tie up some of Elmont's loose ends. C'est la vie, you only get to be the hero if you're poor, a teenager, and in love with the heroine. Basically, not only would this have been a waste of 2 precious hours of my life if Elmont hadn't been in it, but because of him I thoroughly enjoyed this movie.
He hath shewed thee, O man, what is good; and what doth the Lord require of thee, but to do justly, and to love mercy, and to walk humbly with thy God? -Micah 6:8 KJV
They have shewed thee, O teen, what is good; and what doth the world require of thee, but to fit in, be wealthy, have good looks, and be rebellious? -Peer Pressure 1:1
"I hate milk; it's like drinking vomit." -Edward Elric and me. :fmed:
Image

ClaecElric4God in regards to Wolfsong - You're the coolness scraped off the top of this morning's ice cream, after being pulled out of a beautiful summer day!
User avatar
ClaecElric4God
 
Posts: 2045
Joined: Fri May 11, 2012 9:02 am
Location: By the time you read this, I'll probably be somewhere else...

Re: What Movies are you Watching?

Postby GhostontheNet » Mon Aug 26, 2013 2:31 am

Tonight I watched Histoires Extraordinaires directed by Roger Vadim, Louis Malle and Federico Fellini.

Where many Gothic horror films conceive of innocence haunted by a force of evil, these three short films inspired by Edgar Allan Poe stories make the fascinating innovation of corrupt protagonists haunted by a sense of decency. Vadim tells of a countess who is sexually libertine but ruthless as she is drawn by love to her cousin, a man who opts for a quiet life of contemplation and communion with animals. Malle tells of a man who is a sadist, bully, and misogynist as he murders his virtuous doppelgänger only to find he has sealed his own doom. Fellini tells of media vampirism and an actor in a living death who finds no redemption either in spiritual themes of movies he plays in, or a femme fatale who claims to be the woman of his dreams and the key to his salvation.
User avatar
GhostontheNet
 
Posts: 1963
Joined: Mon Aug 02, 2004 12:00 pm
Location: Aurora, CO

Re: What Movies are you Watching?

Postby bigsleepj » Mon Aug 26, 2013 11:33 am

GhostontheNet wrote:Tonight I watched Histoires Extraordinaires directed by Roger Vadim, Louis Malle and Federico Fellini.

Where many Gothic horror films conceive of innocence haunted by a force of evil, these three short films inspired by Edgar Allan Poe stories make the fascinating innovation of corrupt protagonists haunted by a sense of decency. Vadim tells of a countess who is sexually libertine but ruthless as she is drawn by love to her cousin, a man who opts for a quiet life of contemplation and communion with animals. Malle tells of a man who is a sadist, bully, and misogynist as he murders his virtuous doppelgänger only to find he has sealed his own doom. Fellini tells of media vampirism and an actor in a living death who finds no redemption either in spiritual themes of movies he plays in, or a femme fatale who claims to be the woman of his dreams and the key to his salvation.


Never heard of it, but it sounds interesting. I'm not a fan of these kind of films but this one arguably intrigued me (and the famous names attached helps!).
User avatar
bigsleepj
 
Posts: 3432
Joined: Sun Apr 11, 2004 12:00 pm
Location: South Africa - Oh yes, better believe it!

Re: What Movies are you Watching?

Postby GhostontheNet » Mon Aug 26, 2013 12:22 pm

bigsleepj wrote:Never heard of it, but it sounds interesting. I'm not a fan of these kind of films but this one arguably intrigued me (and the famous names attached helps!).


One might call me a horror fanatic. For Edgar Allan Poe fans, Roger Corman's series of Poe films remain unbeaten. Although they aren't terribly accurate to the short stories, Corman knows Poe's themes better than he did. Of these my favorites are House of Usher and The Tomb of Ligeia. Of the 1930's Poe horror films, the best in my opinion are The Black Cat and Murders in the Rue Morgue. More recently, I think the best horror film to bring the Poe style into a contemporary setting is Session 9 in its descent into the maelstrom at the notorious insane asylum of Danvers State Hospital. Histoires Extraordinaires (a.k.a. Spirits of the Dead) are much more European interpretations of Poe, and Poe was popular in Europe before America decided to claim him. They sort of walk the line between being artistic and in good taste, and being eurotrashy exploitation films. In this they probably owe something to the Hammer horror films of Britain. As you might expect, none of these are the jump at you jack-in-the-box thrills of a film like Insidious. Their terror is much more psychological and related to the dark obverse of norms and taboos.
User avatar
GhostontheNet
 
Posts: 1963
Joined: Mon Aug 02, 2004 12:00 pm
Location: Aurora, CO

Re: What Movies are you Watching?

Postby GhostontheNet » Wed Aug 28, 2013 3:28 am

Tonight I watched A.I.: Artificial Intelligence directed by Steven Spielberg.

I dig it, but I can see why this film was so divisive. Especially in terms of the early 2000’s, when Americans were prone to abreact against any media that told them what they didn’t want to hear. I can actually see Stanley Kubrick’s hand all over it, not least in terms of the narrative strategy of starkly different acts like in 2001: A Space Odyssey. Maybe Steven Spielberg should have put in slates before them like in 2001 and The Shining, offering the storybook narrator a chance to interject. Where Spielberg has always been keen on adventure stories, here he has the challenge to sell an existentialist science fiction family drama. The film’s sense of visual futurism is pretty convincing for the most part, except its tech level seems more 2050 than the 22nd century.

It perplexes me that where the aliens at the end (or are they us?) have achieved singularity, the humans are content to maintain a bioconservative humanism toward their own bodies as a doctrine of racial supremacy. And why isn’t there an omnipresent networked data cloud as in Spielberg’s Minority Report of the same year? I feel sorry for the protagonist, programmed as he is for unconditional, obsessive love toward one woman as his sole raison d'être. No mere human can handle this, given as we are to selfishness, pettiness, and fear. Where everything from a teddy bear to a greaser gigolo are programmed with a wisdom or a savoir faire, I think his character should have been written to have a deeper situational awareness at an unconscious level in his condemnation to eternal childhood as a hidden survival mechanism.

Metaphysically, this film is definitely atheist, rendering the search for God as a level of meaning that can only be fulfilled by simulation: deus ex machina. I misunderstood the ending the first time I saw this in terms of the protagonist being plugged into a simulation of his mother, herself now an artificial intelligence, rather than his real mother being brought back for 24 hours through a loophole in space-time. Actually, it would have been better to have simulated her or cloned her, insofar as her character proves incapable of the transformation to accept love at his level of being.
User avatar
GhostontheNet
 
Posts: 1963
Joined: Mon Aug 02, 2004 12:00 pm
Location: Aurora, CO

Re: What Movies are you Watching?

Postby bigsleepj » Wed Aug 28, 2013 12:28 pm

GhostontheNet wrote:It perplexes me that where the aliens at the end (or are they us?) have achieved singularity, the humans are content to maintain a bioconservative humanism toward their own bodies as a doctrine of racial supremacy.


As I understand it the aliens are computers from either a vastly different race that achieved life or it is the remnants of our own technology that moved beyond human data and now want to re-connect with its distant, ancient and equally alien creators.
User avatar
bigsleepj
 
Posts: 3432
Joined: Sun Apr 11, 2004 12:00 pm
Location: South Africa - Oh yes, better believe it!

Re: What Movies are you Watching?

Postby GhostontheNet » Wed Aug 28, 2013 11:40 pm

bigsleepj wrote:As I understand it the aliens are computers from either a vastly different race that achieved life or it is the remnants of our own technology that moved beyond human data and now want to re-connect with its distant, ancient and equally alien creators.


Hmm, maybe. In 2001: A Space Odyssey, Dave Bowman travels “Beyond the Infinite” to a cosmic waiting room in the Versailles style obviously constructed by aliens who know all about human history, and saw it coming as far back as Australopithecus. But he never sees them, he only sees visions of himself at another stage of life before his rebirth as the Star Child to save the world. The implication is that the sight of the aliens would be incomprehensible to him, and to us. A.I.: Artificial Intelligence does something similar insofar as the audience is made privy to the sight of the aliens, but they generally conceal themselves from the protagonist, conveying truthful statements through the proxy of the Blue Fairy. There is only one scene in which he holds a conversation with one of their gifted scientists in the same room. Obviously, I wonder if they should have done the equivalent of when birdkeepers raise chicks through a puppet, which would admittedly be a case of the noble lie in Plato’s cave to constitute a happy ending for the fairy tale. But that’s a different question.

Part of what makes these scenes is that they can have the impact or the meaning that is projected into them by the viewer. They are also on this account both controversial. Contextually, Gigolo Joe makes a plant on which this act pays off when he says “They made us too smart, too quick, and too many. We are suffering for the mistakes they made because when the end comes, all that will be left is us. That's why they hate us, and that is why you must stay here, with me.” Part of the message of the film is that where people sometimes wonder if artificial intelligence is to replace us, artificial intelligence is the worthy heir to human emotion and achievement. Conversely, humanity may not have survived its own folly into a posthuman condition.

They come to earth as archaeologists of the lost civilization of Earth, and the scientist speaks of the greatest human achievement as the search for meaning. He says it as an elegy to something lost in his own epoch. Spielberg seems to believe that the capacity to find meaning will be lost the more advanced a civilization becomes and the more it learns about the universe. One might think of his film Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull when the ruthless Soviet femme fatale is made to combust from the infodump of the aliens’ painfully acquired knowledge; they look on with malice as whatever innocence she still has is destroyed and she dies in despair. Gigolo Joe is an urbane, cosmopolitan character who revels in the absurd irony of his shared quest for the Blue Fairy. He jokes about seducing the Blue Fairy with a psychoanalytic humor suggestive of Freud’s ideas about sex, family, and God.

In the protagonist, the aliens believe they have found the most valuable relic of human civilization and its search for meaning. If they were pure A.I., they would have had to go the same route as the protagonist to be able to value such a thing with wistful nostalgia. But their sense of how remarkable the discovery of the protagonist is doesn’t come across like a finding of their own missing link. I think they are cyborgs, hybrids of organism and machine. They behave and think with a certain organicism, their bodies look completely organic until you look closer, and their technologies have an organicism as they self-construct/deconstruct as needed.
User avatar
GhostontheNet
 
Posts: 1963
Joined: Mon Aug 02, 2004 12:00 pm
Location: Aurora, CO

Re: What Movies are you Watching?

Postby GhostontheNet » Thu Aug 29, 2013 1:19 pm

Last night I watched Chinatown directed by Roman Polanski.

I'm impressed, it's not often you see a detective story where the audience is fully inside the protagonist and knows everything they know, when they know it. This is of course a different pleasure from like, the Sherlock Holmes "Wow, I didn't see that one coming" where the audience is about as befuddled as old-school Watson, or dramatic irony where the audience is made privy to things the detective doesn't know. Like Polanski's other films of the 60's and 70's, the bad guys win and injustice triumphs in a terrible way. As an auteur's countertrend to Hollywood's preference for a happy ending, I think this reflects the way that Polanski lost most of his family to the Holocaust when he was just a boy.
User avatar
GhostontheNet
 
Posts: 1963
Joined: Mon Aug 02, 2004 12:00 pm
Location: Aurora, CO

Re: What Movies are you Watching?

Postby bigsleepj » Fri Aug 30, 2013 12:25 pm

GhostontheNet wrote:Last night I watched Chinatown directed by Roman Polanski.

I'm impressed, it's not often you see a detective story where the audience is fully inside the protagonist and knows everything they know, when they know it. This is of course a different pleasure from like, the Sherlock Holmes "Wow, I didn't see that one coming" where the audience is about as befuddled as old-school Watson, or dramatic irony where the audience is made privy to things the detective doesn't know. Like Polanski's other films of the 60's and 70's, the bad guys win and injustice triumphs in a terrible way. As an auteur's countertrend to Hollywood's preference for a happy ending, I think this reflects the way that Polanski lost most of his family to the Holocaust when he was just a boy.


SPOILER: Highlight text to read: Chinatown is arguably one of the greatest film noirs ever made. I liked how the movie in some subtle ways almost an anti-noir. As opposed to Chandler's Philip Marlow Polanski and Towne's hero Jake Gittes thinks he understands what going on but his experience and cynicism works against him and triggers the tragedy at the end. In most noirs cynicism inoculate the characters from falling too far for lies and deceit, but here it clouds and confuse them.

The movie spawned a sequel called 'The Two Jakes'. Its hardly in the same league as the original but it has a good plot, a good cast and performances and is, in terms of story, a competent continuation. But the director (Jack Nicholson!) drags it out and the movie feels too long. Its not a classic but worth watching at least once.
User avatar
bigsleepj
 
Posts: 3432
Joined: Sun Apr 11, 2004 12:00 pm
Location: South Africa - Oh yes, better believe it!

Re: What Movies are you Watching?

Postby GhostontheNet » Mon Sep 02, 2013 2:17 am

Tonight I watched Night of the Lepus directed by William F. Claxton.

If you saw the killer bunny in Monty Python and the Holy Grail, and thought a plague of giant mutant rabbits would make a good horror picture, this movie is for you. Unlike a campy horror film like Leprechaun, this film makes the bad mistake of refusing to play up the inherent humor of its absurd situation, instead presenting itself with a po-faced seriousness. Where the audience is liable to laugh at its monsters, it renders the havoc the rabbits wreak bloody and brutal, which just makes it worse. The opening newsclip with documentary footage of Australian farmers suffering hordes of rabbits as an invasive species is serious, but that is more of an environmental nuisance than a proper concern for a horror film.
User avatar
GhostontheNet
 
Posts: 1963
Joined: Mon Aug 02, 2004 12:00 pm
Location: Aurora, CO

Re: What Movies are you Watching?

Postby GhostontheNet » Thu Sep 05, 2013 2:14 am

Tonight I watched Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles directed by Steve Barron.

In retrospect, the Americanization of Japanese pop culture ideas in the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles phenomenon must be seen as a cultural transitional into the popularization of anime in the 90’s. This is one of my all-time favorite films on the themes of anger and loss. With the role of the Jim Henson Creature Shop, it displays some spectacularly expressive practical effects in the characters of the turtles and Splinter. Like Fritz Lang’s films about the character of Dr. Mabuse are metaphors for the dangers of Nazism to the Weimar Republic, I think Shredder in this film is a metaphor for the reactionary side of a certain Japanese politics that wants to return to the era of its fascist militarism. Or more generally, to the phenomenon of American neo-fascism in the 90’s. This is why the key to fighting the crime wave is the historical memory of Japanese immigrants including Splinter, why Shredder uses a lot of the techniques Hitler used to inspire loyalty, and why it’s important that Danny repudiates his symbol. One might compare the way the Neo-Nazi group in American History X indoctrinates youth by providing a cool place to hang out, or the efforts of Mishima’s private militia to re-militarize Japanese culture in Mishima: A Life in Four Chapters. Spiritually, Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles fuses a lot of the symbolism of Buddhism and Christianity, often simultaneously. It also has a certain film humor to it, with lines like “Hey, didn't they use this place in The Grapes of Wrath?”
User avatar
GhostontheNet
 
Posts: 1963
Joined: Mon Aug 02, 2004 12:00 pm
Location: Aurora, CO

Re: What Movies are you Watching?

Postby the_wolfs_howl » Thu Sep 05, 2013 12:56 pm

Underworld - A fun action flick with a gorgeous aesthetic. The costumes were awesome (and somewhat reminiscent of The Matrix :P), and the set design was amazing. Anyway, it's a movie about the interminable war between vampires and werewolves, and thankfully the prosthetics and CG were pulled off wonderfully and believably for the most part. Overall, it was a fun movie, but a bit talk-y, if you know what I mean. There was much discussion of the long, sordid history of these two factions who've been fighting for hundreds of years. There were a couple of twists that surprised me, but I didn't really feel invested in any of the characters or care much which side won in the end. I doubt I'll watch it again, but I'm glad I saw it.
User avatar
the_wolfs_howl
 
Posts: 3273
Joined: Thu Mar 01, 2007 11:26 pm
Location: Not Paradise...yet

Re: What Movies are you Watching?

Postby GhostontheNet » Thu Sep 05, 2013 8:19 pm

the_wolfs_howl wrote:Underworld - A fun action flick with a gorgeous aesthetic. The costumes were awesome (and somewhat reminiscent of The Matrix :P), and the set design was amazing. Anyway, it's a movie about the interminable war between vampires and werewolves, and thankfully the prosthetics and CG were pulled off wonderfully and believably for the most part. Overall, it was a fun movie, but a bit talk-y, if you know what I mean. There was much discussion of the long, sordid history of these two factions who've been fighting for hundreds of years. There were a couple of twists that surprised me, but I didn't really feel invested in any of the characters or care much which side won in the end. I doubt I'll watch it again, but I'm glad I saw it.


In terms of vampires and lycanthropes, I always tend to think of the gold standard as the line in Werner Herzog’s Nosferatu the Vampyre when Dracula says to Jonathan Harker “Ah, young man, you are like the villagers who cannot place themselves in the soul of a hunter.” Herzog underscores Harker’s hypocrisy as he eats of a game bird prepared with its eyes and feathers still attatched while a ghostly bird chirp is heard outside, so that he accepts the meat but not the kill. Nowadays, to do a film or novel about vampirism or lycanthropy, you have to know the mythology down pat, and the audience has to know that you know. Something like the Twilight series reinvents the rules in ways that bring audiences who wouldn’t normally get into stories about vampires and werewolfs, but in ways longtime vampire fans hold in almost universal contempt with its sparkling, so-called “vegetarian” vampires.

Underworld, on the other hand, wants to be the series for the hardcore fans, right down to the geeky sidekick who transforms into a vampire/werewolf hybrid. Because people know the rules of vampirism and lycanthropy, it’s harder to do a horror film in which they’re what’s truly scary. In Let the Right One In, what’s scary is not Oskar’s vampire girlfriend/boyfriend Eli (the film and novel conceive of Eli as an androgynous post-gender entity), but bullying, a pedophiliac serial killer, and the prospect the protagonist’s desire for revenge will turn him into a horrible person. One popular way of getting around this is telling these stories as a fantasy action-adventure film. Most often these are told from the perspective of a hunter of the hunters in films like Van Helsing and Hansel and Gretel: Witch Hunters. But a monster can be a good anti-hero, which is what Underworld does with the character of Selene. This blending of classic horror and fantasy continues into the TV series Lost Girl, where such creatures are known collectively as the Fae. I remember I found Underworld’s metaphor of monstrous transformation as adolescence amusing. What I most appreciate about these films are how Goth-friendly they are, which helps foster understanding in certain circles.

Addendum: On the other hand, Ginger Snaps manages very well to be a truly scary werewolf movie, especially in the finale.
User avatar
GhostontheNet
 
Posts: 1963
Joined: Mon Aug 02, 2004 12:00 pm
Location: Aurora, CO

Re: What Movies are you Watching?

Postby drill » Thu Sep 05, 2013 8:37 pm

Castaway. This is at least my fifth time seeing this movie, however, I needed to watch it for my English class.
Image
User avatar
drill
 
Posts: 572
Joined: Sun Jun 23, 2013 4:57 pm

Re: What Movies are you Watching?

Postby LastLfan » Fri Sep 06, 2013 5:11 pm

Rewatched the matrix today, such a good movie
User avatar
LastLfan
 
Posts: 527
Joined: Sun Jul 15, 2012 12:37 pm
Location: Pallet town

Re: What Movies are you Watching?

Postby GhostontheNet » Sun Sep 08, 2013 1:49 am

Tonight I watched Two-Lane Blacktop directed by Monte Hellman.

This movie breaks even in my book. Here you have this cross-country race to Washington D.C. against a mostly sympathetic antagonist, which is actually pretty clever story design. The film banks much less on interesting characters than interesting situations. They get their American macho power trip behind the wheels of some very fast cars, but they don’t get what they really want, not even to go out in a blaze of glory.
User avatar
GhostontheNet
 
Posts: 1963
Joined: Mon Aug 02, 2004 12:00 pm
Location: Aurora, CO

Re: What Movies are you Watching?

Postby GhostontheNet » Mon Sep 09, 2013 3:18 am

Tonight I watched Apocalypse Now directed by Francis Ford Coppola.

Ingmar Bergman once said of Andrei Tarkovsky upon watching Ivan’s Childhood that “Tarkovsky for me is the greatest, the one who invented a new language, true to the nature of film, as it captures life as a reflection, life as a dream”. If so, then Coppola attempts to capture a sense of life as a waking nightmare, particularly in this film. Apocalypse Now is my favorite narrative film set in the Vietnam War, immensely rich in its epic portrayal of what Coppola terms The Idiocy by way of The Odyssey. I think what sets Coppola apart is his sense of colonial histories and philosophical implications, as it situates the narrative in terms of the current state of human thought and culture.

For example, old films about mad scientists have tended to reprove their tragic heroes or villains for “playing God”. But Coppola realizes the situation has changed ever since J. Robert Oppenheimer remembered lines from the Bhagavad-Gita upon witnessing the first atomic tests in which “Vishnu is trying to persuade the Prince that he should do his duty and to impress him takes on his multi-armed form and says, ‘Now I am become Death, the destroyer of worlds.’” Accordingly General Corman says of Colonel Kurtz, “out there with these natives, it must be a temptation to be God.” In other words, the cosmic forces that were once the exclusive domain of divinity and angels have already been terribly wielded in the era which will repopularize Eastern Mysticism in America.

The Gita’s theme of duty will play out as Willard is sent on an absurd black-ops assassination mission, even as he observes “charging a man with murder in this place was like handing out speeding tickets in the Indy 500.” His mandate to terminate Col. Kurtz “with extreme prejudice” is a triple-entendre on the forcible termination of a contract, and the violence of American racism reinforced with routine racial slurs. The American variety of the banality of evil is expressed as Col. Kilgore massacres a Vietnamese village while playing Wagner’s “Ride of the Valkyries” out the helicopters to inspire terror–something the Nazis would have done if they had thought of it–so that he and his men can go surfing in a hail of fire. Col. Kurtz, on the other hand, surrounds himself with Asian and indigenous peoples, and emphasizes while looking toward heaven that conflict must be waged “without judgment... without judgment! Because it’s judgment that defeats us.”

Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari once wrote that “The only modern myth is the myth of zombies”, although they later seemed to have expanded it to two myths with the myth of the deserter who leaves the imperium to join the nomads (i.e. indigenous peoples). This can be said of the Vietnam War in general, Apocalypse Now in specific. More recently, everyone seems to compare Avatar to Pocahontas and Dances With Wolves. But thematically, it reminds me the most of the Bhagavad-Gita and Apocalypse Now. The Na'vi are even blue like Krishna in Hindu art, while an avatar is originally a Hindu term for a divine incarnation. Probably the themes of Apocalypse Now resonate all the more in these times when the American president openly plans drone assassinations on Terror Tuesdays, when extreme prejudice is a grim fact of life, when chemical warfare is a hot-button issue, and when American military forces mass-redeploy to the Asia-Pacific under the Pivot to Asia strategy.
User avatar
GhostontheNet
 
Posts: 1963
Joined: Mon Aug 02, 2004 12:00 pm
Location: Aurora, CO

Re: What Movies are you Watching?

Postby SierraLea » Mon Sep 09, 2013 4:48 pm

Watch The Crucible for school. It may not be flashy, but that movie leaves you thinking with a pit in your stomach. And now I have to write a paper about it!
User avatar
SierraLea
 
Posts: 1255
Joined: Sat Mar 10, 2012 7:57 am
Location: the epitome of laugher

Re: What Movies are you Watching?

Postby the_wolfs_howl » Thu Sep 12, 2013 1:08 pm

Finally got around to seeing Star Trek: Into Darkness. I'm not a Star Trek person by any means, so the only reason I watched this was for Benedict Cumberbatch :P To my surprise, I ended up liking it rather a lot. It was a fun action movie, and surprised me by how much heart it had in it as well. The acting all around was amazing (particularly in the case of Khan and Spock), and I love how they characterized everybody and played them all off each other. Really great character dynamics. I started off thinking Captain Kirk was just a complete jerk, and ended up sympathizing with him quite a lot. It even made me cry at one point.

Definitely recommend this to anyone, whether they're a fan already or know nothing about Star Trek, like me.
User avatar
the_wolfs_howl
 
Posts: 3273
Joined: Thu Mar 01, 2007 11:26 pm
Location: Not Paradise...yet

Re: What Movies are you Watching?

Postby bigsleepj » Sun Sep 15, 2013 12:21 pm

I watched A Monster in Paris. Its an animated French movie dubbed into English. It has a fairly predictable plot and the animation is not as good as most US production but the movie has a weird, likeable charm that I enjoyed. And a great song that gets stuck in your head.
User avatar
bigsleepj
 
Posts: 3432
Joined: Sun Apr 11, 2004 12:00 pm
Location: South Africa - Oh yes, better believe it!

Re: What Movies are you Watching?

Postby GhostontheNet » Wed Sep 18, 2013 2:20 am

Tonight I watched Heavy Metal directed by Gerald Potterton.

This is probably the most audacious North American animated film since Walt Disney’s Fantasia. Strictly speaking, it’s Canadian, although an aesthetic tendency of Canadian film and television is to try and pass for American while presenting content and themes difficult to address in American media. Heavy Metal’s main reason for existence seems to be to give the middle finger to the legacy of the Hayes’ Code and Fredric Wertham’s The Seduction of the Innocent in the era of McCarthyism, as it has affected American attitudes toward comics and animation. Lingering elements of the Disney style only serve to facilitate a perverse sexual humor, as the princesses and evil queens enjoy casual sex.

The world of Heavy Metal is a sci-fi universe in which life is cheap, and people have lost patience with any sense of justice. The sense of a value to life and the possibility of justice are what must be restored to the world. The floating green glowing orb that declares itself to be the ultimate evil and induces deadly bodily transformations cannot but resonate with radioactive matter. These stories have a definite anti-authoritarian streak, and make no qualms about exploiting the capacities of animation for gore and sleazy wish fulfillment. Like pulp comics. As one might expect, the soundtrack is rockin’ Heavy Metal musicians now generally thought of as classic rock with Devo thrown in for good measure. But where Heavy Metal has been most influential is the visual style of science fiction as we presently know it. Not surprisingly, David Fincher, James Cameron, Guillermo del Toro, Zach Snyder, and Gore Verbinski have all expressed an interest in directing segments of a contemporary Heavy Metal film project still caught up in development hell.
User avatar
GhostontheNet
 
Posts: 1963
Joined: Mon Aug 02, 2004 12:00 pm
Location: Aurora, CO

Re: What Movies are you Watching?

Postby GhostontheNet » Wed Sep 18, 2013 2:28 am

bigsleepj wrote:I watched A Monster in Paris. Its an animated French movie dubbed into English. It has a fairly predictable plot and the animation is not as good as most US production but the movie has a weird, likeable charm that I enjoyed. And a great song that gets stuck in your head.


While it doesn't yet have the global pop cultural influence and fanbase of American and Japanese animation, I notice French animation is getting really good. A lot of them do have this quaint charm and sneaky humor, like the way The Triplets of Belleville plays on the Jazzy bare-knuckled quality of pre-Code American animation.
User avatar
GhostontheNet
 
Posts: 1963
Joined: Mon Aug 02, 2004 12:00 pm
Location: Aurora, CO

Re: What Movies are you Watching?

Postby bigsleepj » Wed Sep 18, 2013 12:37 pm

GhostontheNet wrote:
bigsleepj wrote:I watched A Monster in Paris. Its an animated French movie dubbed into English. It has a fairly predictable plot and the animation is not as good as most US production but the movie has a weird, likeable charm that I enjoyed. And a great song that gets stuck in your head.


While it doesn't yet have the global pop cultural influence and fanbase of American and Japanese animation, I notice French animation is getting really good. A lot of them do have this quaint charm and sneaky humor, like the way The Triplets of Belleville plays on the Jazzy bare-knuckled quality of pre-Code American animation.


I loved 'The Triplets of Belleville', and I want to watch the director's The Illusionist. France has always had a very uneven animation history. From high-quality Asterix adaptation movies to psychedelic movies like Fantastic Planet it seems to come and go and never quite got to its feet (though they have an extensive animated television library, a lot of it high quality). Though I'm not particularly fond of its left-leaning political viewpoints I am a big fan of Persepolis, which you should seek out if you haven't already.
User avatar
bigsleepj
 
Posts: 3432
Joined: Sun Apr 11, 2004 12:00 pm
Location: South Africa - Oh yes, better believe it!

Re: What Movies are you Watching?

Postby the_wolfs_howl » Thu Sep 19, 2013 12:22 pm

Because it was Friday the 13th, I decided it was a good time to finally sit down and watch The Shining. And OMG I LOVED IT :dizzy: This is exactly my kind of horror. There was just this wonderful build-up of tension and intrigue through the whole thing that I loved. Very few jump-scares or the cheaper side of horror - just deeply disturbing, though-provoking things building up to a crescendo at the very end. Also some amazing acting on the part of Jack Nicholson and whoever played Danny - seriously freaky kid. And the whole thing was just that much creepier knowing that the makers of this movie originally wanted to shoot the film at my college ._.

Warning to anyone who might be curious and doesn't know this already: There's some pretty blatantly implied demonic possession going on, and a scene with full-on female nudity (that can be skipped easily).
User avatar
the_wolfs_howl
 
Posts: 3273
Joined: Thu Mar 01, 2007 11:26 pm
Location: Not Paradise...yet

Re: What Movies are you Watching?

Postby GhostontheNet » Sat Sep 21, 2013 1:17 am

the_wolfs_howl wrote:Warning to anyone who might be curious and doesn't know this already: There's some pretty blatantly implied demonic possession going on, and a scene with full-on female nudity (that can be skipped easily).


I don't think The Shining's is a horror universe that needs demonic possession. Here's my reasoning. In the last shot of the film, which doesn't give away the ending, we see Jack Torrence as the life of the party among the jet set in a photograph signed July 4th, 1921. In other words, he was the one who killed his wife and twin daughters gifted with the psychic powers of those "who shine". That is how they show Danny the scene of their death, much like Danny sends out an S.O.S. to Dick Hallorann after Jack has sabotaged the radio. They say abuse is often cyclical from one generation to the next, and The Shining draws upon the horror motif of the generational curse while conveying the theme that the curse can be broken. Stephen King has told stories about inhuman evil. But the evil of the ghosts of the jet set is all too human, the kind of evil that builds a posh hotel on a site marked by genocide of indigenous peoples, the kind of evil that throws grand parties upon the mass slaughter of World War I. In other words, the kind of evil that makes a torrent of blood, one of the film's most famous symbolic images.

The ghosts get Jack on their side in 3 ways. A.) They feed Jack's alcoholism to win his loyalty and drop his psychological inhibitions to acts of violence. The alcohol is termed "white-man's burden" in ironic evocation of Rudyard Kipling's sense of the British colonial mandate, and to the opiate of the reservations. B) They allow his psychosis to build with the extreme isolation, which they relieve with grand parties to condition him to believe that all good things come from them. In each of these they deliberately put a fulcrum between Wendy's efforts to connect and maintain ties to humanity. C) The bathroom talk on the values of American racist patriarchy, and the violence it must impose to maintain its power and privilege. It's blunt, but it is what a lot of people in 1921 believed, as they made clear with the revival of the Ku Klux Klan and the wave of lynchings. In the 1920's, the KKK managed to take control of Colorado's politics, all the way up to Mayor Stapleton of Denver. In the end, Jack is convinced to do what he has already done. There's a certain mystery to this. Does this imply something like Plato's notion of anamnesis? Or must Jack be convinced every time? Why does Jack come back to repeat the cycle while they remain unchanged in all those decades?

I think the function of the nude scene is to convey the mythological elements of the narrative. On one level, the woman in Room 237 is a siren or a river nymph to draw Jack’s desire away from Wendy. Jack has spoken of his family as a kind of possession, i.e. “Let me go collect my family.” Lloyd the ghostly bartender has indulged Jack in a drunken misogynistic ranting in which he reveals he considers Wendy to be a kind of reproductive machine, but also by that token an object of desire. To get Jack to murder his family, they have to convince him of the same precedence as the Dred Scott v. Sandford case, as it ruled with regard to the question of slavery of the right of the master to dispose of his property however he saw fit. So by sending her in to tempt and sexually humiliate Jack, the ghosts have got Jack by the balls. This is reinforced when she leaves strangle-marks on Danny to destroy the trust between Jack and Wendy, and so push him further toward their side. Another parallel is to the Lady of the Lake who bestows Excalibur to King Arthur, although he is an unworthy hero. The myth of the psychic powers of those “who shine” is treated as a myth of the holy grail. Danny is the young Arthur, and Dick Hallorann is the wise old magus Merlin. Hallorann feeds Danny ice cream in a beautiful lustrous grail dish while explaining the special powers they share to link the grail to the shining. Like Herod’s efforts to murder little Jesus, or Carrie’s encounter with the Salem Witch Scare mentality, the potential this raises for change is something the powers that be want to crush. It should also be noted a common interpretation of the holy grail is as a symbol for female sexuality, and the earliest Christian grail legends are basically euphemistic stories about how to ask a girl for her number. Jack has been unable to find the will to reciprocate Wendy’s efforts to connect relationally and sexually, retreating to a novel he isn’t really writing. So here the element of the repressed returns with a vengeance, transforming his character for the worse.
User avatar
GhostontheNet
 
Posts: 1963
Joined: Mon Aug 02, 2004 12:00 pm
Location: Aurora, CO

Re: What Movies are you Watching?

Postby GhostontheNet » Tue Sep 24, 2013 2:06 am

Tonight I watched The Housemaid directed by Kim Ki-young.

Apparently, The Housemaid is considered one of the best South Korean films of all time, and a remake was recently filmed in 2010. The opening scene shows two children playing cat’s cradle, as the string transforms its definition while remaining a spider web from which it is more and more difficult to extricate. That is the metaphor of this film, as the dynamic of power shifts dramatically from scene to scene only to reinforce the underlying structures of repression. It is a film at the point in which family melodrama transforms into a terrifying psychological thriller, and it is relentless. The film establishes its worldview of a South Korea utterly constrictive in its mores, and a protagonist and his family who have no desire to free themselves from its demands. The story concerns how they take in a housemaid, and how she takes over the house to establish a reign of terror following a tumultuous affair. Perhaps this functions as a political metaphor for the brutal dictatorship of Syngman Rhee in the South, who would be ousted in the April Revolution of 1960, the very year of this film’s release.
User avatar
GhostontheNet
 
Posts: 1963
Joined: Mon Aug 02, 2004 12:00 pm
Location: Aurora, CO

Re: What Movies are you Watching?

Postby the_wolfs_howl » Thu Sep 26, 2013 2:21 pm

GhostontheNet wrote:I don't think The Shining's is a horror universe that needs demonic possession.

The main instance of demonic possession I was referring to was Danny, with his "boy that lives in his mouth." The way Tony would just take over Danny's body completely really seemed to be indicating demonic possession to me. What's interesting is that Tony actually seemed to be trying to warn Danny and Wendy that they would be in grave danger if they went to the hotel. So this particular demon doesn't seem to be completely evil - just parasitic, I guess. At the very worst, Tony just doesn't want Danny to die because then he wouldn't have a host to inhabit anymore. In a lot of ways, Tony reminded me of the kind of "demons" that appear in anime from time to time - not necessarily evil, just neutral spirits. This doesn't exactly align with Biblical definitions of demons, but I don't think we can expect Stephen King to get everything theologically right :P

But yeah, my point is that Tony seems to be a lot more like a demon than a ghost (the party-goers could go either way). Unless you want to go the purely psychological route and say that all of the stuff that happens in this movie is completely due to Jack and Danny's delusions and psychosis. While the psychological aspect can't be ignored, by any means, there really seemed to be an indication that this was also the work of demons.


On a lighter note, I got to see The Wolverine in the dollar theater :jump: Fun, solid action flick, full of cool fight scenes, parkour chases, and Logan one-liners :lol: It was fun to get a movie set in Japan, and I got really excited when Hiroyuki Sanada (my favorite Japanese actor) came on screen :n_n: Nothing earth-shattering, but definitely worth a watch if you like Hugh Jackman's portrayal of Wolverine.
User avatar
the_wolfs_howl
 
Posts: 3273
Joined: Thu Mar 01, 2007 11:26 pm
Location: Not Paradise...yet

Previous Next

Return to General Entertainment

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 27 guests